Le mappe dei miei sogni Epub á mappe dei miei PDF

Le mappe dei miei sogni Epub á mappe dei miei  PDF I started this book ravenously Science Youth Grief then I lost momentum Then I fell into it again Adventure Bloodshed Secret Societies then I became cynical about it One character says, Grief, youth, science People are so goddamn predictable I should write a book about how to suckerpunch people into caring When I finally finished it, I put it down with a fair respect for both its accomplishments and its shortcomings.Here s the hook 12 year old cartographer genius Tecumseh Spa I started this book ravenously Science Youth Grief then I lost momentum Then I fell into it again Adventure Bloodshed Secret Societies then I became cynical about it One character says, Grief, youth, science People are so goddamn predictable I should write a book about how to suckerpunch people into caring When I finally finished it, I put it down with a fair respect for both its accomplishments and its shortcomings.Here s the hook 12 year old cartographer genius Tecumseh Sparrow TS Spivet goes on an adventure and fills the margins of his story with notes and illustrations that offer clever visual representations of verbal information Compelling Here s the rub TS lives with his parents who are as one dimensional a cowboy and scientist as can be Dad rarely speaks without apostrophes, and Mom rarely retreats from her work and his sister, who teenybops through most of her time on the page They all live with the shadow of Layton, TS younger brother who died in a gun accident These and other characters develop little In fact, I m not sure there are any real people in this novel Boo But the adventure and dramatic scenarios are enjoyable just the same We quickly learn that TS has won a great prize from the Smithsonian for his drawing portfolio, and the novel recounts the story of his solo adventure to DC, which leads to our revelations and his surprising discoveries about his family But how old is TS when he tells the story The voice never quite settles down The story takes three parts, and their differences evoke a kind of structural schizophrenia The first section The West reads like a character driven novel set in the mountains of Montana Is that redundant Mountains of Montana TS navigates his gruff and silent father, his meticulous and officious mother, his irritable and angst ridden sister, and the demons of his brother s death His charts and diagrams make us see everything in new ways, but still we wonder what makes this family fit together This could be a novel in itself.But then we re off The second section The Crossing lulls us into the genealogy of the Spivet family and the emptiness of the Great Plains Stolen notebooks read like historical fiction and the ennui of the plains turns into a wormhole Suddenly there s magical realism and life threatening bloodshed Action Alas, however, the diagrams become less interesting and less profound.And then the third section The East juices us with a secret society thriller that reads like a cross between teen fiction and political diatribe teenagers navigate secret tunnels between governmental halls of power, adults bicker senselessly like children while hatching plans against the president and his administration, mysterious characters from TS journey impossibly turn out to have been insiders all along What Suddenly, Plot cashes out and Suspension of Disbelief asks us for a loan the size of the national debt Thepages I turned, theI wanted to know what happened next, but thethe mystery thriller undercut what little serious interest I had in TS and his family as characters.What saves The Selected Works of T.S Spivet for me are the wonderful verbal visual puzzles, the occasional moment of literary sleight of hand the sparrows The worm hole The subtle foreshadowing , and, of course science, youth, and grief Reading parts of this was truly electric, even if it doesn t fully redeem characters I don t believe in and an inconsistent frame for the narrative at large Do I recommend itYes, for escape on a rainy day Would I teach itNot likely, though I might excerpt some passages and pictures Related TextsPale Fire The Da Vinci Code, Illustrated Edition The Answer is Always Yes Lasting impressionsBoy genius, broken family, secret society thriller The Selected Works of TS Spivetwants to be everything, but it doesn t fully succeed Along the way, however, it does elicit some moments of emotional pull, and it entertains us and opens up new possibilities for the novel That s no mean feat You might think that novel readers would be pretty immune to the scourge of looksism if you haven t got the looks you ism worth my time which saturates the rest of the entertainment biz There is the lure of the pretty cover, of course who doesn t want to be seen in public with this on your arm Rather than thisBut we aren t like 14, we have better reasons when we choose our novels than just the sexy covers, don t we Yeah, sure we do We ve half read a review somewhere or somebody mentioned You might think that novel readers would be pretty immune to the scourge of looksism if you haven t got the looks you ism worth my time which saturates the rest of the entertainment biz There is the lure of the pretty cover, of course who doesn t want to be seen in public with this on your arm Rather than thisBut we aren t like 14, we have better reasons when we choose our novels than just the sexy covers, don t we Yeah, sure we do We ve half read a review somewhere or somebody mentioned that they liked this or wasn t it on tv And isn t the author married to somebody I think it won an award It s got a good title All good reasons to read a novel But I ended up with The Selected Works of T.S.Spivet out of pure looksism It s so pretty It pretends to be by this brilliant 12 year old boy who maps everything, i.e makes beautiful quasi scientific diagrams of everything My First Inertia Experiment, Drainage Patterns in the Stubborn Bitterroots, Father Drinks Whiskey with a Sensational Degree of Regularity, etc etc, so the whole large sized book is crammed with gorgeous marginalia, little digressions, flocks of birds irrupting from the south west corner, exploded diagrams of cars, genealogies, on and on This makes the in store browsing of the book a rare delight, but the actual reading of the book as slow as a snail with bad shoes and a poor attitude But also I found out that not only the format was cute but the characters were cute and the story was cute too It began to be aarrgghhhh can t breathe cute overload cute overload You have this family with the boy genius, his 16 year old sassy sister, his tragic brother, his cowboy father and his scientist mother who he calls Dr Clair There s a dog called Verywell upon whom several pages are expended The boy goes on a quest Uh oh This is all beginning to look like a mashup of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time and the Glass Family stories As I read I could tell the numerous quirky incidents and digressions where I was supposed to feel the love for this novel, they weren t hard to miss, but I did not feel the love for this novel, I felt the massive irritation Our narrator is a 12 year old windbag He thinks everything is interesting He never shuts up He never uses one word where a bucketful will do Everything is not interesting however I knew that But I must learn once again that looks aren t everything There are some books that touch methan others, some characters that I love to love and love to hate.But nothing and no one has made my heart ache the way this book has In this book, Reif Larsen has created a story so beautiful in its simplicity and at the same time, filled with layers and layers of complexity This book reminds me of ancient artifacts, items handled with loving care through time, to be held in your hands with reverence and wonder that something can last so long and be so There are some books that touch methan others, some characters that I love to love and love to hate.But nothing and no one has made my heart ache the way this book has In this book, Reif Larsen has created a story so beautiful in its simplicity and at the same time, filled with layers and layers of complexity This book reminds me of ancient artifacts, items handled with loving care through time, to be held in your hands with reverence and wonder that something can last so long and be so important.The Selected Works of T.S Spivet is a journey, both personal and literal T.S Spivet, the plucky 12 year old cartographer, sets off on an adventure across the country to get to the Smithsonian to give a speech We, as readers, journey through T.S s mind and life, and the journey is wondrous We come in contact with his family, his ancestors, the strangers he meets, and the places he sees And we come to know T.S., which is perhaps, one of the most rewarding parts of this book.T.S is a twelve year old mapmaker, raised on an isolated Montana ranch He views the world through the eyes of a map maker, wishing to chart and depict everything he sees And he does His sidebars show us his diagrams of Gracie shucking corn, of his father s facial expressions, of the amount of 12 year old boys pinching honey nut cheerios at the same time His take on the world is refreshing, seen through the analytical eyes of a scientist with the curiosity of a young boy and the heart of a lonely one I love T.S because he has an artless way of viewing life, analyzing it, confused when it doesn t add up, but nevertheless smiles and enjoys it He never gives into his fear, always facing everything as it comes He puts himself on a train, faces threatening hobos, and the sea of 783 eyes that all claim to knowthan him His bravery amazes me, his wit amuses me, and his loneliness breaks my heart I felt simultaneous tugs of sadness and ruefulness at his map of loneliness, complete with earbuds and a caption that says you re not alone He has an insight into the little rituals of our reality that makes me want to laugh and cry.We journey with T.S., through his past with the diary of his ancestor, Emma Osterville Engelthorpe, and through the ditry bowels of Chicago to the revered halls of the Smithsonian Once there, T.S questions the world as we know it, raising questions and showing the pompous scientists that this little boy haswisdom than they even know He makes some of the most profound observations and with the simplicity and beauty that only children achieve He learns about celebrity and thingymabobs and his father and mother, he learns about secret societies and homesickness.This book is a rich experience, from start to end, and one of my favorites For the first time in my life, I deliberately lingered over a book, savoring the words Larsen puts on the pages Each character and moment is lovingly handcrafted and really shows a depth to writing that so few authors achieve I didn t do the book any justice at all, but it truly is a glorious book to be read again and again.Several months later, 1st ReRead Amazing This book could never disappoint me The second time around, I m discovering tiny magical details, making new connections, and enjoying it all over again The tremendously quirky characters in this story alone were enough to make me give it five stars, but there are so many themes that the book addresses, like not selling your soul for prestige, making new friends and dealing with the past instead of running from it. When the Smithsonian decides to award genius cartographer T S Spivet the presitigious but little known Baird Award, they are completely unaware that young T S short for Tecumseh Sparrow is actually a twelve year old prodigy addicted to mapping everything, from family dinner conversations to Loneliness on the streets of Chicago The Smithsonian also doesn t know that T S has no way of getting to Washington, D.C from his family s Montana ranch, but that doesn t stop him from hopping a tra When the Smithsonian decides to award genius cartographer T S Spivet the presitigious but little known Baird Award, they are completely unaware that young T S short for Tecumseh Sparrow is actually a twelve year old prodigy addicted to mapping everything, from family dinner conversations to Loneliness on the streets of Chicago The Smithsonian also doesn t know that T S has no way of getting to Washington, D.C from his family s Montana ranch, but that doesn t stop him from hopping a train and taking up the life of a hobo to fulfill his young life s dream of visiting the greatest museum in the country From Montana to D.C and to the halls of the Smithsonian, T S maps his progress in strange and inventive ways, detailing his discovery of secret hobo networks in Pocatello, wormholes in the Midwest, and an encounter with a knife wielding prophet in Chicago.I tend to ignore debut works and authors that get a lot of press as the Best New Thing because let s face it, there are plenty of older books yet to be read , so I m not sure why I added this to my to read list when I heard about it Maybe the title caught my attention, even though I secretly thought it was going to be something smug and pretentious Either way, despite my hesitation, The Selected Works of T S Spivet was a great read T S was far too charming to dislike, and the illustrations on every page made for an entertaining and interesting read Ran into a bit of trouble near the end the conclusion was way too abrupt and sudden, and some of the dealings of the secret society though amusing seemed a bit farfetched but overall, this book was a huge surprise If this is Larsen s first novel, I can t wait to see what he does next This book has great shelf appeal It s got a gazillion illustrations ostensibly by our first person narrator, a 12 year old cartographer and technical illustrator from Montana in bygone days he would be a naturalist living with an entomologist mom, a bronco busting dad, a sister older than her years, and the memory of a dead brother The prose reveals a quirky character and rewards slow going.But here s the problem I m only a couple dozen pages in and there are mistakes It could be the problem This book has great shelf appeal It s got a gazillion illustrations ostensibly by our first person narrator, a 12 year old cartographer and technical illustrator from Montana in bygone days he would be a naturalist living with an entomologist mom, a bronco busting dad, a sister older than her years, and the memory of a dead brother The prose reveals a quirky character and rewards slow going.But here s the problem I m only a couple dozen pages in and there are mistakes It could be the problems of producing a complicated book But if the nature of our protagonist is to be meticulous, and we have every reason to believe that it is, you gotta get the first chapter cold, I don t care how many sets of galleys The other, delicious possibility is that Reif Larsen is setting us up with an unreliable narrator Ooooh, that would be great But I worry So let me list the ones I find here Page 4, Geometry.I had once tried lining maps on the south wall of my room, but in my excitement to organize, I briefly forgot that this was where the entrance to my room was locatedThe thing is, the door is on the north wall of the room Not a big problem except that we spend half of page 3 the first page in the book orienting the room, including drawing a map of it, on which we see the locations of his various colors of notebooks Note August 2011, 2 years later I saw a paperback edition of this book on a shelf in a bookstore, and, thinking about this problem, checked out the opening Now it says the maps were on the north side of the room So somebody cared enough to fix the mistake Well done Page 11 forteGracie was a misunderstood actress sharpening her fort Hmmm If this kid is pedantic, he ll spell it without the accent, because it s originally pronounced fort It s French, the stiff part of a foil, not Italian for loud This is not so egregious asPage 11 PiratesWe hear that Gracie was probably miraculous as the pirate s wife in her high school production of Pirates of Penzance Well There is no pirate s wife There are wards in chancery, of which Mabel is the star, and of course Ruth, the piratical maid of all work So again did Larsen leave these in because the 12 year old would not get them right, or did he screw up and not do his homework I hope it s the former Now, having finished I d say the book largely lives up to its promise, but a the unreliable narrator problems mentioned here don t get resolved and b the last, oh, quarter of the book fails us, becoming too black and white and losing its focus on TS s amazing voice It s kind of like the arc of Nicholas Cage s movie career TS Spivet un genio dodicenne che disegna mappe Vive in un ranch del Montana con il padre, un cowboy silenzioso, e con la madre, una studiosa di coleotteri che da vent anni alla ricerca di una mitica specie di scarafaggio Il fratello morto e la sorella apparentemente normale TS cerca di dare un ordine alle cose tracciando su un taccuino mappe bellissime e meticolose Mappe di tutto del comportamento della famiglia, di animali, di piante, di posti, di cose La sua avventura comincia quando si mette in viaggio per andare a ricevere un importantissimo premio conferitogli dallo Smithsonian Institution Scappa nel cuore della notte e su un treno merci attraversa l America per oltremiglia incontro alla fama Ma proprio questo ci che vuole Le mappe e le liste sono davvero capaci di spiegare il mondo, il suo confuso affastellarsi di dolori, silenzi, misteri E l enigma che sono gli adulti Le illustrazioni di Spivet accompagnano e arricchiscono tutta la storia I ve still got a few pages to dust up here But the Review was written hundreds of pages ago So, let s go sides, it ll be short and sweet.This novel has very little to recommend it view spoiler I take that back just a little bit you might get a copy for your thirteen year old daughter in order to introduce the Encyclopedic Novel to her why not view spoiler and don t forget this branch of the Shandian Spawn and some formally innovative YA novels by the likes ofSusie Day,E Lo I ve still got a few pages to dust up here But the Review was written hundreds of pages ago So, let s go sides, it ll be short and sweet.This novel has very little to recommend it view spoiler I take that back just a little bit you might get a copy for your thirteen year old daughter in order to introduce the Encyclopedic Novel to her why not view spoiler and don t forget this branch of the Shandian Spawn and some formally innovative YA novels by the likes ofSusie Day,E Lockhart, andLauren Myracle hide spoiler hide spoiler Mostly just the wonderful Book Design And so as always credit where due Book design and typography by Ben GibsonThe illustrations were created by Ben Gibson and Reif Larsen except which were created by Martie Holmer and Ben Gibson and are based on the author s original drawings.Moby Dick map created by Ben Gibson Should have his name on the frontcover but too frequently even translators go under credited Further, in case you miss it there on the back inside flappy thingy of the dj, Jacket illustration of sparrow skeleton by Jeff Middleton You ll see a blurb on the backcover by Stephen King Which is warning enough No but the book really is a nice object and might be worth picking up for that alone But despite one of the characters apparently being rather opposed to mediocrity The Mother declares Mediocrity is a fungus of the mind which is itself of course a pretty mediocre thing to say What wouldn t be , well, the novel never rises anywhere close to above mediocrity And too sometimes you just want to chuckle over the mis match of form how it is said and content what is declared as true there s the whole thing about how awful the Miss USA thingy is because there s no talent portion and it s all focused on women s appearance and nothing about her intelligence and scientific endeavors Because I know I know the book s about this twelve year old here, but still the book s got only just that one thing going for it It s pretty And but if you find yourself attracted to the book s various musings and ponderings, being tempted to quote them, please remember, the novel s narrator is a 12 year old boy The movie is not to be recommended either But if you just have to, because I suppose you might be a fan of director Jean Pierre Jeunet, look for it under the title The Young and Prodigious T.S Spivet It really does suck And not just because it turns our young hero from a master draftsman Cartographer into the inventor of the perpetual motion machine, but because it s just pretty awful Some of you interested in censorship and this kind of issue, though, maybe might have an interest in the movie The Union Pacific gets turned into something like American Railway and McDonald s gets turned into a Hot Dog Stand Now, this probably isn t censorship, but probably simply acknowledgement that neither UP nor McD s paid the producers to advertise for them But then, why no revenue stream for the novel which does much to promote both brands Yes, yes, I know this is what PoMo does with all the pop cult references and yadda yadda yadda But, please do note that the truck which picks up the kid is still clearly branded as a Kenworth Do you think Kenworth paid their promotional fee Or does the average Franco Canadian Australian filmmaker not even recognize Kenworth as a brand In which case, Kenworth better start up and start branding itself in the public s eye I didn t watch this, but the title leapt out at me Think Branding, with Google Conference Keynote Branding in the New Normal ismy speed WARNING Comments MAY BE disabled for this video due to Vegan Militants Well, what do you know After a string of bedazzling reads Crowley, Dunnett, and Murray , my disillusionment with contemporary lit continues apace.A twelve year old genius cartographer with a quirky and symbolic name has blah blah adventures on a train en route to picking up a prize at the Smithsonian which he is too young to have honestly qualified for meaning misinformation was entered on the official application form mothers were mislead important people were lied to and for which he h Well, what do you know After a string of bedazzling reads Crowley, Dunnett, and Murray , my disillusionment with contemporary lit continues apace.A twelve year old genius cartographer with a quirky and symbolic name has blah blah adventures on a train en route to picking up a prize at the Smithsonian which he is too young to have honestly qualified for meaning misinformation was entered on the official application form mothers were mislead important people were lied to and for which he has squirreled himself away on a cross continental choo choo trip without telling anyone in his family On the way to an utterly predictable ending, this adorable child ruminates about many things, including his Tragic Past, his unloving parents, his dwindling stash of carrot sticks and raisins, and the inanimate objects with which he occasionally holds conversations.Are we getting a read on how precious this all is Yes CHIEF AMONG MY COMPLAINTS That age old trick of omitting mention of a Tragic Occurrence so devastating, so catastrophic, that it ejects the brokenhearted narrator from his grief riven family and propels him two thousand miles across the country on a hobo hopping train adventure until the very end of the story, which, incidentally, is when everything else is coming to a head, so as to maximize dramatic impact and wring a tear from my dry miser s eye Seriously I can just feel these writers doing the literary equivalent of those algebraic equations your 9th grade pre calculus teacher used to pile onto your desk Which is not bad, in and of itself, but when the import of the story is inadequately translated, the framing and the braces and the exposed rivets come into view And when your insubstantive content fails to cover up the artificiality of your story telling, well, then, guess what Belief falls all to pieces I m hesitant to blame this on MFA programs, but I do think the failure of certain literary books is not helped by cloistered classroom settings where everyone is looking for the quick emotional fix and the quickest way to secure it is to resort to age old techniques that have received the institutional imprimateur You may ask is technique the problem here I do think so, but it is not sufficient by itself to make a mess of things The employment of a tiringly overused narrative strategy is also compounded by how emotionally thin this story is It does not push your boundaries Nothing really menaces the main character Stakes are piddling Characters are quirky, but their quirks are poor masks for their hollowed out interiors Larsen has one ace up his sleeve, and once that s spent, he s done And that s when he brings in the ridiculous revelations and the deus ex machina endings What was it that Chabon once wrote Stories that glitter all over with epiphanic dew I mean, I totally dig epiphanic dew I down epiphanic dew by the vat, I read so much But done badly, and or in ways that feel like, been there seen that Just, no The multiple things that are thrown in there just for funsies sake but never really explained, developed, or made to contribute anything significant to the advancement of the plot or to the growth of various characters For example random wormholes Secret scientific societies Oh so his mom knew all along The themes and or plot events that are developed are conventional, banal, easy Washington s scientific establishment, previously enshrined in Spivet s mind as a place of monkish learning and ascetic devotion to matters of the mind, is full of money grubbers and cynical fame whores People, like tobocco chewing cab drivers, are not what they seem Family love prevails over all Home is where the heart is And on and on, ad nauseam.And yes, I do think the ness of my response does have something to do with how I felt betrayed by this book s initial promise At least its premise was interesting at least the first 50 100 pages were really cute Despite my complaints, Larsen does this vulnerable boy voice very, very well It isthan occasionally diverting It is clever But the story never really builds itself into something meaningful, or moving Hence, disappointment.Oh, god, guys Obviously this means I have to take refuge in nonfiction BUT THERE ARE SO MANY BOOKS, IN SO MANY CATEGORIES I don t know where to start , fanfiction, or classics written two hundred years ago For example John has 300 feet of lumber to frame a rectangular snake pen, which he plans on filling with a festering nest of poisonous African bush vipers, plus an additional 200 feet of brick for his collection of feral mongoose He wants to maximize the area of his playpen, but because of the animosity between his pets cannot afford to group them all into one enclosure Due to the constraints imposed on his property by the city s infuriatingly byzantine zoning codes, he is also only able to construct pens which are twice as long in length as they are in width What should the dimensions of the areas be Show how the maximum area of the pens are calculated from a host of algebraic equations What a charming idea Brilliant 12 year old boy maps his way through life, with the book including many of these maps and other illustrations in the margin In theory, a Tom Sawyer esque tail of adventurous travel from Montana to Washington, D.C.Well, in reality, not so charming, not so entertaining, something of a slog, and as the illustrations most often come with writing, really a novel with footnotes One needs to be careful with these If the writer is to drag the reader away from the s What a charming idea Brilliant 12 year old boy maps his way through life, with the book including many of these maps and other illustrations in the margin In theory, a Tom Sawyer esque tail of adventurous travel from Montana to Washington, D.C.Well, in reality, not so charming, not so entertaining, something of a slog, and as the illustrations most often come with writing, really a novel with footnotes One needs to be careful with these If the writer is to drag the reader away from the story, please make it worth our while Clocking in at 350 pages, the book is both way too wordy for Pete s sake, do editors even edit anyDo they take stands against blah blah blah and underwritten um, plot please Well, interesting, flesh it out and not just provide every written thought and internal digression, please Frankly, 2 stars is generous, and only b c the illustrations, as annoying as they are, are lovely As for this being a genius 12 year old speaking, no, I don t think so I have a 12 year old boy He s smart enough, but, no, it s a stretch to think that they have such boring internal lives

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